fuckyeahfelines:

baby Tiger
(submitted by royalpiratseu)

fuckyeahfelines:

baby Tiger

(submitted by royalpiratseu)

270 notes
posted 12 minutes ago (® fuckyeahfelines)
healthier-habits:

How to roast butternut squash —a superfood high in fiber, antioxidants, phytonutrients, beta-carotene and anti-inflammatory compounds.
Click here for full directions!

healthier-habits:

How to roast butternut squash —a superfood high in fiber, antioxidants, phytonutrients, beta-carotene and anti-inflammatory compounds.

Click here for full directions!

127 notes
posted 22 minutes ago (® healthier-habits)
322 notes
posted 24 minutes ago (® myshipperheart)

art history meme | 4/7 sculptures/other media: Winged Victory of Samothrace (Nike of Samothrace) (200-190B.C.)
The Nike of Samothrace, discovered in 1863, is estimated to have been created around 200-190 BC. It is 8ft (2.44m) high. It was created to not only honor the goddess, Nike, but to honor a sea battle. It conveys a sense of action and triumph as well as portraying artful flowing drapery through its features which the Greeks considered ideal beauty. It stood on a rostral pedestal of gray marble from Lartos representing the prow of a ship (most likely a trihemiolia), and represents the goddess as she descends from the skies to the triumphant fleet. Before she lost her arms, which have never been recovered, Nike’s right arm is believed to have been raised, cupped round her mouth to deliver the shout of Victory. The work is notable for its convincing rendering of a pose where violent motion and sudden stillness meet, for its graceful balance and for the rendering of the figure’s draped garments, compellingly depicted as if rippling in a strong sea breeze. The Nike of Samothrace is seen as an iconic depiction of triumphant spirit and of the divine momentarily coming face to face with man. It is possible, however, that the power of the work is enhanced by the very fact that the head is missing.

art history meme | 4/7 sculptures/other media: Winged Victory of Samothrace (Nike of Samothrace) (200-190B.C.)

The Nike of Samothrace, discovered in 1863, is estimated to have been created around 200-190 BC. It is 8ft (2.44m) high. It was created to not only honor the goddess, Nike, but to honor a sea battle. It conveys a sense of action and triumph as well as portraying artful flowing drapery through its features which the Greeks considered ideal beauty. It stood on a rostral pedestal of gray marble from Lartos representing the prow of a ship (most likely a trihemiolia), and represents the goddess as she descends from the skies to the triumphant fleet. Before she lost her arms, which have never been recovered, Nike’s right arm is believed to have been raised, cupped round her mouth to deliver the shout of Victory. The work is notable for its convincing rendering of a pose where violent motion and sudden stillness meet, for its graceful balance and for the rendering of the figure’s draped garments, compellingly depicted as if rippling in a strong sea breeze. The Nike of Samothrace is seen as an iconic depiction of triumphant spirit and of the divine momentarily coming face to face with man. It is possible, however, that the power of the work is enhanced by the very fact that the head is missing.

3,116 notes
posted 4 hours ago (® starlorrd)

a-sword-without-a-hilt:

Have a little Greece, because Greece is flipping lovely.

133 notes
posted 15 hours ago (® a-sword-without-a-hilt)

weloveshortvideos:

Cutest thing ever - Vine by Cheyenne Moore

10,068 notes
posted 17 hours ago (® weloveshortvideos)
125 notes
posted 18 hours ago (® schnitzeltits)
mythologer:

Aphrodite Anadyomene, Greek, Hellenistic Period, 3rd-1st century BC

mythologer:

Aphrodite Anadyomene, Greek, Hellenistic Period, 3rd-1st century BC

410 notes
posted 20 hours ago (® mythologer)
Sometimes you have to give up on people. Not because you don’t care, but because they don’t.
- Unknown    (via hiddlesluscious)
169,674 notes
posted 1 day ago (® jae--lasoul)
252 notes
posted 1 day ago (® erimari)

athens-archaeological-museum:

One of the most beautiful displays at the top floor of the museum- the pottery collection.

Odi et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris?
Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.
-

Catullus 85 

"I hate and I love. Why do I do this, perhaps you ask? / I do not know, but I feel that it is done to me and I am crucified." 

(via didoofcarthage)

93 notes
posted 1 day ago (® didoofcarthage)

thejadedkiwano:

Let’s play a game.

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

you, also, what, when, why, how, look, because, never

132,497 notes
posted 1 day ago (® thejadedkiwano)
132 notes
posted 2 days ago (® thatwetshirt)
aseaofquotes:

Jane Austen, Emma
Submitted by brochant.

aseaofquotes:

Jane Austen, Emma

Submitted by .

1,970 notes
posted 2 days ago (® aseaofquotes)

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